Process

Process measures look at the efficacy and timeliness of care. This includes how well hospitals provide patients with the best standard of care for common conditions or surgical procedures, how quickly hospitals treat patients with medical emergencies and how well hospitals provide preventive services. Ohio State Wexner Medical Center scored above the national average in 13 of 18 measures including surgical, stroke and leg/lung blood clot care. We are working to improve our scores in the other areas which are all related to reducing wait times for patients in the emergency department.

Process: Effectiveness of Care
Stroke (April 2015 - March 2016) Wexner Medical Center Performance National Average Comparison Charts Additional Information
Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) Prophylaxis 98% 97% Patient receives medication in the hospital that helps prevent blood clots.
Discharged on Antithrombotic Therapy 99% 99% Ischemic stroke patients who received a prescription for medicine known to prevent complications caused by blood clots at discharge.
Anticoagulation Therapy for Atrial Fibrillation/Flutter 99% 97% Ischemic stroke patients with a type of irregular heartbeat who were given a prescription for a blood thinner at discharge.
Thrombolitic Therapy 100% 87% Patients whose strokes were caused by a blockage in the blood supply to the brain (ischemia) who got medicine to break up a blood clot within 3 hours after symptoms started.
Antithrombotic Therapy by End of Hospital Day 2 95% 98% Ischemic stroke patients who received medicine known to prevent complications caused by blood clots within 2 days of hospital admission.
Discharged on Statin Medication 99% 97% Patient is sent home taking medications that help reduce bad cholesterol levels. Lower bad cholesterol levels can reduce the risk of future stroke.
Stroke Education 94% 94% Ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke patients or caregivers who received written educational materials about stroke care and prevention during the hospital stay.
Assessed for Rehabilitation 99% 98% Ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke patients who were evaluated for rehabilitation services such as occupational and physical therapy.
Venous Thromboembolism (July 2015 - June 2016) Wexner Medical Center Performance National Average Comparison Charts Additional Information
Venous Thromboembolism Warfarin Therapy Discharge Instructions 96% 93% Patients with blood clots who were discharged on a blood thinner medicine and received written instructions about that medicine.
Hospital Acquired Potentially-Preventable Venous Thromboembolism 2% 2% Patients who developed a blood clot while in the hospital who did not get treatment that could have prevented it.
Perinatal Care (July 2015 - June 2016) Wexner Medical Center Performance National Average Comparison Charts Additional Information
Elective Delivery Prior to 39 Completed Weeks Gestation 0% 2% Percent of mothers whose deliveries were scheduled too early (1-2 weeks early), when a scheduled delivery was not medically necessary.
Cesarean Section - Overall Rate 30% no data
Antenatal Steroids 98% no data
Exclusive Breast Milk Feeding 45% 53%
Exclusive Breast Milk Feeding Considering Mothers Choice 56% no data
Health Care-Associated Bloodstream Infections in Newborns 0% no data
Immunization (July 2015 - June 2016) Wexner Medical Center Performance National Average Comparison Charts Additional Information
Influenza Immunization 93% 94% The immunization measure looks at how often patients who visit the hospital are offered a flu shot. We perform at a rate slightly higher than the national average.
Health Care Provider Immunization (October 2015 - March 2016) Wexner Medical Center Performance National Average Comparison Charts Additional Information
Influenza Vaccination Coverage among Healthcare Personnel 93% 86% When our staff is immunized against illnesses like the flu, our patients are better protected, too. Our staff has a higher rate of being vaccinated than the national average.
Emergency Department Throughput (July 2015 - June 2016) Wexner Medical Center Performance National Average Comparison Charts Additional Information
Median Time (in Minutes) from ED Arrival to ED Departure for Admitted ED Patients 436 335 Inpatient Emergency Department (ED) Throughput measures look at the time it takes patients to receive care and be admitted to the hospital. Wexner Medical Center has one of the busiest EDs in the state of Ohio.  The most current data, which reflects wait times from the end of 2014 and the middle of 2015, indicates that we are performing below national standards for admitting patients from the ED. However, during that timeframe, we had just opened our expanded ED and the new James Cancer ED, so the data likely don’t reflect our performance today. We are continually working to improve our processes and reduce wait times.
Median Time (in Minutes) from Admit Decision Time to ED Departure Time for Admitted Patients 176 134 Inpatient Emergency Department (ED) Throughput measures look at the time it takes patients to receive care and be admitted to the hospital. OSU Wexner Medical Center has one of the busiest EDs in the state of Ohio.  The most current data, which reflects wait times from the end of 2014 and the middle of 2015, indicates that we are performing below national standards for admitting patients from the ED. However, during that timeframe, we had just opened our expanded ED and the new James Cancer ED, so the data likely don’t reflect our performance today. We are continually working to improve our processes and reduce wait times.
Outpatient Emergency Department Throughput (July 2015 - March 2016) Wexner Medical Center Performance National Average Comparison Charts Additional Information
Median Time (in Minutes) from ED Arrival to ED Departure for Discharged ED Patients 229 171 Inpatient Emergency Department (ED) Throughput measures look at the time it takes patients to receive care and be admitted to the hospital. Wexner Medical Center has one of the busiest EDs in the state of Ohio.  The most current data, which reflects wait times from the end of 2014 and the middle of 2015, indicates that we are performing below national standards for admitting patients from the ED. However, during that timeframe, we had just opened our expanded ED and the new James Cancer ED, so the data likely don’t reflect our performance today. We are continually working to improve our processes and reduce wait times.
Median Time from ED Arrival to Provider Contact for ED patients 31 27 Inpatient Emergency Department (ED) Throughput measures look at the time it takes patients to receive care and be admitted to the hospital. OSU Wexner Medical Center has one of the busiest EDs in the state of Ohio.  The most current data, which reflects wait times from the end of 2014 and themiddle of 2015, indicates that we are performing below national standards for admitting patients from the ED. However, during that timeframe, we had just opened our expanded ED and the new James Cancer ED, so the data likely don’t reflect our performance today. We are continually working to improve our processes and reduce wait times.
Left Without Being Seen 5% 2% Inpatient Emergency Department (ED) Throughput measures look at the time it takes patients to receive care and be admitted to the hospital. OSU Wexner Medical Center has one of the busiest EDs in the state of Ohio.  The most current data, which reflects wait times from the end of 2014 and themiddle of 2015, indicates that we are performing below national standards for admitting patients from the ED. However, during that timeframe, we had just opened our expanded ED and the new James Cancer ED, so the data likely don’t reflect our performance today. We are continually working to improve our processes and reduce wait times.
Outpatient Pain Management (April 2015 - March 2016) Wexner Medical Center Performance National Average Comparison Charts Additional Information
Median Time to Pain Management for Long Bone Fracture 75 52
Outpatient Endoscopy/Polyp Surveillance (January 2015 - December 2015) Wexner Medical Center Performance National Average Comparison Charts Additional Information
Appropriate Follow-up Interval for Normal Colonoscopy in Average Risk Patient 94% 80%
Colonoscopy Interval for Patients with a History of Adenomatous Polyps - Avoidance of Inappropriate Use 99% 87%
Inpatient Psychiatric Facilty Reporting (CY 2015) Harding Hospital Performance National Average Comparison Charts Additional Information
HBIPS-2: Hour of Physical Restraint (Rate per 1000 Patient Hours) 0.04 0.68 The use of physical restraint increases a patient's risk of physical and psychological harm. This intervention is only intended for use if a patient is in imminent danger to him/herself or others and if less restrictive interventions have failed. We outperform both state (0.48) and national benchmarks.
HBIPS-3: Hours of Seclusion Use (Rate per 1000 Patient Hours) 0.71 0.49 The use of seclusion increases a patient's risk of physical and psychological harm. This intervention is only intended for use if a patient is in imminent danger to him/herself or others and if less restrictive interventions have failed. We have results greater than both state (0.32) and national benchmarks.
HBIPS-5: Patient Discharged on Multiple Antipsychotic Medications wtih Appropriate Justification 20% 57% Higher rates of HBIPS-5 indicate higher quality of care because documenting reasons for assigning two or more antipsychotics suggests that careful consideration of the benefits of this course of treatment were weighed against the potential patient side effects. We are performing below state (64%) and national averages. This has been an area of ongoing education with physicians, residents, and NPs.
HBIPS-6: Patients Discharged from Hospital-Based Inpatient Psychiatric Setting with a Continuing Care Plan Created 55% 85% Providing detailed information enhances the preparation of patients to self-manage post-discharge and comply with treatment plans. Randomized trials have shown that many hospital readmissions can be prevented by patient education, pre-discharge assessment, adn domiciliary aftercare. We are currently performing below both state (92%, 85%) and national benchmarks. HBIPS-6 and & were retired as of December 31, 2015.
HBIPS-7: Post-Discharge Continuing Care Plan Transmitted to Next Level of Care Provider Upon Discharge 52% 79%
SUB-1: Alcohol Use Screening 92% 87% Individuals with mental health conditions experience substance use disorders at a much higher rate than the general population. Co-occuring substance use disorders often go undiagnosed and, without treatment, contribute to a longer persistence of disorders, poorer treatment outcomes, lower rates of medication adherence, and greater impairments to functioning. We are currently outperforming both state (90%) and national benchmarks.
TOB-1: Tobacco Use Screening 88% 91% Tobacco use is currently the single greatest cause of disease in the U.S., accounting for more than 435,000 deaths annually. This health issue is especially important for persons with mental illness and substance use disorders. We are currently slightly below the state (89%) and national benchmarks.
TOB-2/2a: Tobacco Use Treatment Provided or Offered/Tobacco Use Treatment The tobacco treatment measure indicates the rate of patients to whom tobacco use treatment was offered and provided or refused. This includes practical counseling to quit and FDA-approved smoking cessation medications. We are currently performing below the state (64%, 31%) and national benchmarks for TOB 2 and 2a.
TOB-2 41% 62%
TOB-2a 24% 31%
IMM-2: Influenza Immunization (Patient) 94% 71% Increasing influenza vaccination can reduce unnecessary hospitalizations and secondary complications, particularly among high risk populations, such as the elderly. We are currently outperforming both state (77%) and national benchmarks.

Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) Prophylaxis

Discharged on Antithrombotic Therapy

Anticoagulation Therapy for Atrial Fibrillation/Flutter

Thrombolitic Therapy

Antithrombotic Therapy by End of Hospital Day 2

Discharged on Statin Medication

Stroke Education

Assessed for Rehabilitation

Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis

Intensive Care Unit Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis

Venous Thromboembolism Patients with Anticoagulation Overlap Therapy

Venous Thromboembolism Patients Receiving Unfractionated Heparin with Dosages/Platelet Count Monitoring by Protocol or Nomogram

Venous Thromboembolism Warfarin Therapy Discharge Instructions

Hospital Acquired Potentially-Preventable Venous Thromboembolism

Elective Delivery Prior to 39 Completed Weeks Gestation

Cesarean Section - Overall Rate

Antenatal Steroids

Exclusive Breast Milk Feeding

Exclusive Breast Milk Feeding Considering Mothers Choice

Health Care-Associated Bloodstream Infections in Newborns

Influenza Immunization

Influenza Vaccination Coverage among Healthcare Personnel

Median Time (in Minutes) from ED Arrival to ED Departure for Admitted ED Patients

Median Time (in Minutes) from Admit Decision Time to ED Departure Time for Admitted Patients

Median Time (in Minutes) from ED Arrival to ED Departure for Discharged ED Patients

Median Time from ED Arrival to Provider Contact for ED patients

Left Without Being Seen

Median Time to Pain Management for Long Bone Fracture

Appropriate Follow-up Interval for Normal Colonoscopy in Average Risk Patient

Colonoscopy Interval for Patients with a History of Adenomatous Polyps - Avoidance of Inappropriate Use

HBIPS-2: Hour of Physical Restraint (Rate per 1000 Patient Hours)

HBIPS-3: Hours of Seclusion Use (Rate per 1000 Patient Hours)

HBIPS-5: Patient Discharged on Multiple Antipsychotic Medications wtih Appropriate Justification

HBIPS-6: Patients Discharged from Hospital-Based Inpatient Psychiatric Setting with a Continuing Care Plan Create

HBIPS-7: Post-Discharge Continuing Care Plan Transmitted to Next Level of Care Provider Upon Discharge

SUB-1: Alcohol Use Screening

TOB-1: Tobacco Use Screening

TOB-2

TOB-2a

IMM-2: Influenza Immunization (Patient)