An obstetrical ultrasound examination read  by an Ohio State Maternal Fetal Medicine (MFM) physician can give you more details about your pregnancy and the health of your baby. An MFM physician is an obstetrician who specializes in the care of both mother and baby in complicated, high-risk pregnancies.

About halfway through your pregnancy (18-20 weeks of gestation), you will most likely have an anatomy ultrasound of your baby. This ultrasound is used to determine if there are any fetal anomalies and the baby’s size and weight, and to measure the overall growth.

While an ultrasound examination will not improve your pregnancy’s outcome, it can aid in providing you and your family with information to be better prepared for your baby’s arrival.

Our Services

General Ultrasound Examinations

General Ultrasound Examinations

Fetal Heart Ultrasound Examinations

Fetal Heart Ultrasound Examinations

Obstetrical Ultrasound Examinations

Obstetrical Ultrasound Examinations

Why Choose Ohio State?

Why Choose Ohio State

  • Our MFM physician expertise is unmatched in central Ohio. All of our sonographers are certified to ensure the best images of your baby. 
  • We have specialized maternal fetal medicine physicians, a dedicated nurse and multiple genetic counselors who care for mothers and babies identified as high-risk. Our program takes care of pregnancies with red blood cell antibodies where possible fetal transfusions are needed for fetal anemia. We also provide prenatal care and delivery planning for babies identified to have fetal anomalies. 
  • Our team collaborates closely with Nationwide Children’s Hospital to ensure the best care and delivery planning for high risk babies. 
  • We are the only group in central Ohio that can perform early fetal echocardiograms, with more than 5+ years’ experience.
  • Our licensed and board-certified team of genetic counselors will review your family history, assess your risks, explain your testing options, help you understand your test results and support you through your pregnancy whenever you have questions or concerns. 

Our Patients

Our Patients

Your pregnancy might be considered high-risk for a number of reasons, including:
  • You are younger than 17 years old or more than 35 years old.
  • You are pregnant with more than one baby.
  • You have had three or more miscarriages.
  • Your pregnancy has been found to have an increased risk for a genetic condition or birth defect, such as Down syndrome, a heart defect or spina bifida.
  • You had a problem in a past pregnancy, such as preeclampsia, seizures or clotting disorders. 
  • History of having a premature baby or found to have a short cervical length measurement

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