2022 Archived Media

ADHD symptoms in adults

March 30, 2022 | U.S. News & World Report
Online audience: 15.4 million
WTOP-FM (via U.S. News & World Report)
Online audience: 1.2 million
ADHD is often thought of as a “kids’ condition” as it’s so closely associated with breathless children racing around a classroom and being unable to sit still. But ADHD can impact adults too, and its effects can be devastating. Dr. Eugene Arnold is quoted.

Eating this popular food can lead to dementia, study says

March 25, 2022 | Best Life
Online audience: 1.3 million
MSN (via Best Life)
Online audience: 67.2 million
With aging, many fear the onset of memory loss, which can eventually progress into more serious conditions such as Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia. While it is understood that diet can directly impact your waistline, new data suggests that a certain type of popular food may also impact your risk of developing cognitive issues later in life. Ruth M. Barrientos is quoted.

Is my depression getting worse?

March 24, 2022 | U.S. News & World Report
Online audience: 15.4 million
WTOP-FM (Washington, D.C., via U.S. News & World Report)
Online audience: 1.2 million
According to 2017 data from the National Institute of Mental Health, an estimated 17.3 million adults in the United States had at least one major depressive episode. That figure represents 7.1% of all U.S. adults. Jay Fournier is quoted.

Foods and activities to fight SAD

March 23, 2022 | U.S. News & World Report
Online audience: 15.4 million
MSN (via U.S. News & World Report)
Online audience: 64.5 million
Changes in seasons can sometimes correspond with changes in mood. In some people, this natural connection between emotions and the weather can develop into a condition called seasonal affective disorder, or SAD. Dr. Samar McCutcheon is quoted.

Opinion: Basic healthcare for people with disabilities should be the norm, not a specialty

March 23, 2022 | Columbus Dispatch
Online audience: 495,461
Print audience: 84,419
Susan Havercamp and others write... Most people would agree that a well-trained physician — or nurse, patient care tech or any other healthcare professional — should be prepared to give people effective care regardless of gender, race or age. That’s Inclusivity 101. But for too many in healthcare, Inclusivity 101 leaves out a very large group: people with disabilities.

Institutional perspectives in psychiatry: Addressing challenges in depression treatment

March 23, 2022 | HCPLive
Online audience: 68,042
Treatment-resistant depression was the main topic during HCPLive’s® recent State of the Science event called Institutional Perspectives in Psychiatry: Addressing Challenges in Depression Treatment. Dr. Subhdeep Virk, Dr. Douglas Misquitta, Dr. Kevin Reeves and Dr. Nagy Youssef are quoted.

Is depression genetic or environmental?

March 22, 2022 | U.S. News & World Report
Online audience: 15.4 million
WTOP-FM (via U.S. News & World Report)
Online audience: 1.2 million
If you've been experiencing more feelings of anxiety or depression lately, you're definitely not alone. A 2021 report from KFF found that during the pandemic, 4 in 10 adults in the U.S. reported symptoms of anxiety or depressive disorder, up from 1 in 10 who reported those symptoms from January to June 2019. Jay Fournier is quoted.

UNDERDOG: The science that has you rooting for the team that isn’t supposed to win

March 18, 2022 | FOX News
Online audience: 21.6 million
March Madness is officially underway and Friday night Wright State University will be the underdog playing as the No. 16 seed against No. 1 seed Arizona. You may find yourself jumping on the underdog bandwagon and your brain is what’s driving you there. Chelsi Day is quoted. This coverage resulted from pitching efforts by OSUWMC Media Relations.

What to expect after taking Xanax and how long it stays in your system

March 18, 2022 | INSIDER
Online audience: 8.8 million
Alprazolam, available under the brand name Xanax, is a prescription medication in the benzodiazepine class commonly used to treat anxiety and panic disorders. It is also sometimes prescribed for depression, premenstrual syndrome, and insomnia. Dr. Douglas Misquitta is quoted.

Why moms are staying up late at night, sacrificing sleep for sanity with ‘revenge bedtime procrastination’: ‘It’s as close to vacation as you can get’

March 17, 2022 | Yahoo! Life
Online audience: 149.3 million
In a bid for some alone time or just a quiet moment, people — but moms especially — are sacrificing sleep for sanity, staying up into the wee hours of the night to squeeze out some “me time.” Helena Rempala is quoted.

Is ketamine effective in treating depression?

March 15, 2022 | U.S. News & World Report
Online audience: 15.4 million
WTOP-FM (via U.S. News & World Report)
Online audience: 1.2 million
Research data suggests that ketamine administered intravenously two days a week for four to six weeks can provide therapeutic benefit that can be maintained for months. Dr. Subhdeep Virk is quoted.

Philip Heit Center for Healthy New Albany adds Ohio State Wexner mental-health services

March 10, 2022 | ThisWeek Community News
Online audience: 43,290
Print audience: 384,728
Mental- and behavioral-health services are now part of mix of wellness resources at the Philip Heit Center for Healthy New Albany. The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, which already has a presence at the facility, has added 13 new psychologists, psychiatrists and master’s-degree-level psychotherapists who practice in 14 offices and two group rooms on the second floor. Tonya Schmauder is quoted. Kristin Carpenter is mentioned.

Ohio State offensive lineman Harry Miller announces medical retirement, reveals mental health battle

March 10, 2022 | Eleven Warriors
Audience not available
Harry Miller will not be returning to the field for the Buckeyes, and he shared a powerful message about why. Dr. Joshua Norman is mentioned.

Pentagon starting new gun safety suicide prevention campaign

March 3, 2022 | American Military News
Online audience: 627,317
Federal News Network
Online audience: 211,338
The Department of Defense revealed this week it is launching a renewed gun safety campaign as part of an effort to address suicides among the ranks. Craig Bryan is quoted.

Subhdeep Virk, MBBS: Emerging therapies for treatment resistant depression

March 4, 2022 | HCPLive
Online audience: 68,042
In an interview with HCPLive, Dr. Subhdeep Virk, an associate professor of clinical psychiatry and director of the Treatment Resistant Depression Program at Ohio State University’s Wexner Medical Department of Psychiatry, talked about the emergence of new therapies for depression and how there is hope on the horizon in treating this patient population.

Defense Department to expand gun safety efforts in an attempt to reduce military suicides

March 3, 2022 | Military Times
Online audience: 848,189
Yahoo News (via Military Times)
Online audience: 36.1 million
Fifth Domain
Online audience: 15,101
Washington Examiner
Online audience: 2.3 million
Military leaders are planning to significantly expand their gun safety programs in an effort to stem suicides among service members, following the lead of other federal agencies and public health experts. In testimony before the House Armed Services Committee, Craig Bryan said that gun safety issues are too often overlooked when public policy planners work on suicide prevention efforts. This coverage resulted from pitching efforts by OSUWMC Media Relations.

DOD adding 63,500 virtual mental health appointments for troops, but ’a whole lot more’ can be done

March 2, 2022 | Air Force Magazine
Audience: 69,137
The Pentagon plans to ramp up its use of telehealth to help service members with mental health concerns as the number of service member suicides continues to trend the wrong way, leaders told a Congressional panel March 2. Craig Bryan is quoted.

10 ways to reduce inflammation

March 2, 2022 | Eating Well
Audience not available
Inflammation is part of your body's natural defenses-when a cut swells up and turns red, that's inflammation at work healing you. But when it goes into overdrive, sparked by factors like poor diet and smoking, it can cause a host of health problems including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, arthritis (including psoriatic arthritis), cancer and even depression. Janice Kiecolt-Glaser is quoted.

Exhausted from living through stressful events? A resilience expert’s 6 tips to stay encouraged

February 26, 2022 | MSN
Online audience: 67.2 million
Call it news fatigue. Thanks to issues like the pandemic, climate change, economic problems, inequality, and political instability, well... we’ve all been living through some pretty unique historical events. Now, with the war between Russia and Ukraine on the list—does anyone else want off this ride? Ken Yeager is quoted.

Why the phrase 'beer before liquor' isn't true and what's actually causing you to get sick from drinking

February 25, 2022 | INSIDER
Online audience: 8.8 million
Food & Beverage Reporter
Audience not available
Beer before liquor never been sicker, liquor before beer, you're in the clear. It's a common saying at college parties, bachelorette parties, and other big nights out, but experts say there's no truth to the rhyme. Brad Lander is quoted.

Upper Arlington Schools Notes: Board of education eager to hear input from community

February 25, 2022 | Columbus Dispatch
Online audience: 495,461
Print audience: 84,419
Upper Arlington Schools is uniquely equipped to address the needs of our students thanks to a network of full-time mental health and physical health services in our schools. We are excited to expand on this network by partnering with The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center Behavioral Health Services and Office of Student Life to provide access to school-based behavioral health services to our students and families.

WonderBus Music & Arts Festival 2022

February 23, 2022 | WVMX-FM/Mix 107.9
Online audience: 592
Vindicator
Online audience: 26,461
Tribune Chronicle
Online audience: 38,467
WBNS-TV/10
Online audience: 336,662
WCMH-TV/4
Online audience: 442,485
CityScene
Online audience: 1,821
The WonderBus Music & Arts Festivalreturns to The Lawn at CAS in Columbus, Ohio, this summer with THREE DAYS OF MUSIC! WonderBus is the sister festival to WonderStruck in Cleveland and WonderRoad (Indianapolis). The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center’s Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Health is mentioned.

Cold water plunges are trendy. Can they really reduce anxiety and depression?

February 20, 2022 | New York Times
Online audience: 43.3 million
Cold water immersion has garnered a lot of attention lately, especially for its supposed mental health benefits. Preliminary evidence suggests there may be something to it, but the science behind how or why cold water affects mental health is still unclear. Sophie Lazarus is quoted.

What is high-functioning anxiety?

February 21, 2022 | U.S. News & World Report
Online audience: 15.4 million
What's going on behind the façade of competence and organization can be an emotional roller coaster of anxiety, self-consciousness and fear. Lawrence Needleman is quoted.

How companies can support their employees' mental health

February 22, 2022 | Columbus CEO
Online audience: 25,983
Rick Milenthal and Dave Grzelak are long-time business partners who have developed a deep friendship over the course of 17 years. So, five years ago when Milenthal saw that his friend’s son was struggling with his mental health and dealing with suicidal thoughts he tapped all the resources and connections he had to get help. The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center is mentioned.

Suicide rates during the pandemic

February 20, 2022 | Psychiatric Times
Online audience: 38,075
During 2020, there was an increase in reports of depression, anxiety, and other indicators of mental health problems among most Americans. Suicide rates in the United States were also predicted to skyrocket—but, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, they actually dropped by 3%. In this Mental Health Minute video, Craig Bryan, PsyD, ABPP, of the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center discusses some possible reasons for this decline and suicide rates, going forward. Craig Bryan is quoted.

Middle-school children fall prey to fatal fentanyl overdoses

February 18, 2022 | CNN
Online audience: 47.6 million
At age 14, Alexander Neville was still very much a curious kid. He had no idea that the pills he was taking were actually prescription knockoffs laced with fentanyl, a synthetic opioid. Unintentional drug overdoses led to 200,000 years of lost life for US preteens and teens who died between 2015 and 2019, a January study found. The story links to a study led by Dr. O. Trent Hall.

Suicide rates during the pandemic

February 15, 2022 | Psychiatric Times
Online audience: 188,566
During 2020, there was an increase in reports of depression, anxiety, and other indicators of mental health problems among most Americans. Suicide rates in the United States were also predicted to skyrocket—but, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, they actually dropped by 3%. Craig Bryan is quoted.

Drug overdoses among young Americans translate into over one million years of lost life

February 7, 2022 | Yahoo News (via USA Today)
Online audience: 36.1 million
February 1, 2022 | CNN
Online audience: 47.7 million
Young people from ages of 10 to 24 years old may have lost greater than 1 million years of life from 2015 to 2019, according to a recent JAMA Pediatrics article. Dr. O. Trent Hall is quoted. This coverage resulted from a news release distributed by OSUWMC Media Relations.

Mental health is a focus for Team USA at Beijing Olympics

February 7, 2022 | Highland County Press
Online audience: 12,127
During the Summer Olympics in Tokyo last year, star gymnast Simone Biles shined a light on the mental health struggles many Olympians face when she decided to withdraw from competition. Dr. Joshua Norman is quoted.

DeWine: Nearly $15M of ARPA Block Grant funding will help strengthen behavioral health care services

January 26, 2022 | Highland County Press
Online audience: 12,127
Daily Sentinel
Online audience: 3,162
Ohio Governor Mike DeWine Wednesday announced that $14.9 million in American Rescue Plan (ARPA) Supplemental Block Grants funds will be used to help strengthen Ohio’s statewide mental health and addiction care services system, specifically in the areas of youth prevention and early intervention services. The Ohio State University College of Medicine Early Psychosis Intervention Center is mentioned.

COVID-19 strain: Healthcare workers increasingly seek mental health help

January 24, 2022 | Healthline
Online audience: 43.7 million
The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has seen a steep decrease in mental health across different groups, while new research finds doctors are also reaching their limits during the pandemic. Arianna Galligher is quoted.

PTSD and dementia risk: A potential target for early intervention

January 21, 2022 | Psychiatry Advisor
Online audience: 53,625
The growing population of older adults and increasing rates of dementia highlight the critical need for measures that may attenuate the risk of dementia in vulnerable populations. Christopher Nguyen is quoted.

 

 View our faculty in the media archive

2021 Archived Media 

Looking to keep up a New Year’s resolution? Experts say it’s best to start small

December 29, 2021 | Columbus Dispatch
Online audience: 495,461
Print audience: 84,419
CNET
Online audience: 33.6 million
It’s the start of 2022, which for many in the Greater Columbus area and across the country means once again setting New Year’s resolutions. So for those who want to keep up their resolutions this year, experts say to start small. Sophie Lazarus is quoted.


Restricting supply alone is not the answer to the opioid crisis

December 28, 2021 | Clinical Pain Advisor
Online audience: 18,086
The current system to address the U.S. opioid epidemic is not ideal. Policies and guidelines have focused primarily on reducing opioid prescribing and restricting supply. However, the opioid crisis requires new approaches to prescription opioid management, according to a special article published in the journal Anesthesiology. Dr. Orman Trent Hall is quoted. 


Risk score combination more accurately predicts suicidal behavior

December 10, 2021 | Healio
Online audience: 691,485
Adding Suicide Cognitions Scale questions to the commonly used Public Health Questionnaire-9 improved the accuracy of suicide risk screening in primary care clinics, data show. Craig J. Bryan is quoted.


CBT: A way to reshape your negative thinking and reduce stress

Novmeber 27, 2021 | CNN
Online audience: 47.7 million
Wouldn't you like to stop your stressful, anxious thinking in its tracks? Turns out you can, and while you're at it, you can make yourself feel and act better too. That's the basis of cognitive behavioral therapy, which burst onto the psychological scene in the 1960s and has been gathering accolades ever since. Jay Fournier and Kristen Carpenter are quoted.


Adele’s album just dropped: Why her sad songs make us feel so good

November 23, 2021 | Everyday Health
Online audience: 3.9 million
Adele’s long-awaited, just-released album 30 is the latest breakup album to top the charts, in good company with another romance-gone-wrong classic, Taylor Swift’s Red. Variety reported this week that the British icon’s new album is now the top-seller of the year, just three days after its release. If you’re wondering why the moody ballads are striking a chord for you right now, mental health experts may have the answer. Arianna Galligher is quoted. 


More than just downtime and a meal: Thanksgiving poses stressful time for students

November 23, 2021 | The Lantern
Online audience: 69,421
Newsbreak (via The Lantern)
Online audience: 2.2 million
The holiday season’s planning, travel and emotional burdens present a challenge to the population as a whole. Kristen Carpenter is quoted.  


What is adjustment disorder?

November 17, 2021 | U.S. News & World Report
Online audience: 15 million
WTOP-FM (via U.S. News & World Report)
Online audience: 1.2 million
Everyone has stress in their lives. But for some people, a specific traumatic episode or major life change can lead to a mental health problem called adjustment disorder. Justin Baker is quoted.


Support, hope exist for young adults struggling with mental health

November 16, 2021 | Columbus Dispatch
Print audience: 84,419 | Online audience: 495,461
In a guest column, Jeffrey Schottenstein writes: When I was a freshman at Ohio State, the anxiety and depression that began to manifest as a teenager intensified to the point that, even on a campus surrounded by thousands of people, I felt helpless and alone. Dr. K. Luan Phan is mentioned. 


The pandemic didn’t increase suicides. That shouldn’t be a surprise

November 16, 2021 | STAT
Online audience: 1.7 million
Craig Bryan writes, "In the early stages of the Covid-19 pandemic, mental health experts and members of the media predicted that the pandemic and its effects on society may lead to an uptick in suicides."


Ohio State raises suicide prevention awareness through open dialogue

November 15, 2021 | The Lantern
Online audience: 69,421
WOSU/NPR 
Broadcast audience: 108,100
Daily Advent
Audience not available
The Wexner Medical Center at Ohio State is partnering with Ohio State’s Harding Hospital and the Department of Psychiatry and Behavorial Health at the Ohio State College of Medicine to raise awareness for suicide prevention. Dr. K. Luan Phan and Craig Bryan are quoted. This coverage resulted from pitching efforts by WMC Media Relations.


Suicide rates declined again in 2020, but not for all groups, CDC report shows

November 3, 2021 | NBC News
Online audience: 17.4 million
In the early days of the pandemic, there were fears that the anxiety, isolation and financial uncertainty would lead to a rise in suicide. Instead, after two decades of rising suicide rates in the U.S., the number of deaths by suicide declined in 2020 for the second year in a row, according to preliminary federal data published Wednesday. Craig Bryan is quoted.


PTSD and fireworks season: 5 ways to cope with booms and bright lights
June 30, 2021 | Everyday Health
Online audience: 3.9 million

Summer often brings with it bright and booming fireworks shows, especially on patriotic holidays like the Fourth of July. Yet as beautiful as these light displays are, they can be triggering for people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Craig Bryan is quoted.


Anxious as we transition out of the pandemic? That’s common and can be treated, experts say
June 29, 2021 | CNN
Online audience: 47.7 million

America is in celebratory mode. States are dropping COVID-19 restrictions, plane travel is breaking records, and many Americans are gearing up to celebrate summer as if the last year plus of pandemic madness never happened. Kristen Carpenter is quoted.


Bipolar medications and weight gain: What to know
June 28, 2021 | U.S. News & World Report
Online audience: 15 million
MSN (via U.S. News & World Report)
Online audience: 67.2 million
Yahoo! (via U.S. News & World Report)
Online audience: 149.3 million

A 2018 survey conducted by the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance of nearly 900 people with bipolar disorder or depression found that weight gain was the side effect that most often led people to stop taking a medication. Dr. Samar McCutcheon and Dr. Douglas Misquitta are quoted.


What Is adjustment disorder?
June 23, 2021 | U.S. News & World Report
Online audience: 15 million

Everyone has stress in their lives. But for some people, a specific traumatic episode or major life change can lead to a mental health problem called adjustment disorder. Justin Baker is quoted.


Is depression genetic or environmental?
June 15, 2021 | U.S. News & World Report
Online audience: 15 million
Yahoo! News (via U.S. News & World Report)
Online audience: 36.1 million

If you've been experiencing more feelings of anxiety or depression lately, you're definitely not alone. A 2021 report from KFF found that during the pandemic, 4 in 10 adults in the U.S. reported symptoms of anxiety or depressive disorder, up from 1 in 10 who reported those symptoms from January to June 2019. Jay Fournier is quoted.


6 surprising signs you may have anxiety
June 7, 2021 | U.S. News & World Report
Online audience: 15 million
MSN (via U.S. News & World Report)
Online audience: 67.2 million
Yahoo! (via U.S. News & World Report)
Online audience: 149.3 million

Anxiety – as it refers to a set of disorders including social anxiety disorder and generalized anxiety disorder, affects more than 18% of the U.S. adult population each year. That makes it the most common mental illness in the country, according to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America. Lawrence Needleman and Dr. Zachary Kelm are quoted.


What is 'toxic masculinity'? How we define what it means to be a man affects violence, relationships
June 3, 2021 | Columbus Dispatch
Online audience: 495,461
Print audience: 84,419

Few things are as ingrained in American culture as the concept of what it means to be "a man." Ask any man, and they'll likely all say that from an early age, they've been told variations of the same lessons and expectations. Dr. Douglas Misquitta is quoted.


13 easy phrases that will help you set healthy boundaries
May 27, 2021 | The Healthy
Online audience: 843,633
MSN (via The Healthy)
Online audience: 67.2 million

Healthy boundaries are crucial to our mental health, and most of us know we should set them. The tricky part: learning how to say no without worrying we'll lose friends or anger family. Arianna Galligher is quoted.


How to manage intrusive thoughts — a common phenomena of upsetting, unwanted thoughts that won't go away
May 14, 2021 | INSIDER
Online audience: 8.8 million
MSN India (via INSIDER)
Online audience: 67.2 million

If you're distracted by unwanted and upsetting notions, ideas, or images that arise spontaneously and are difficult to get rid of, you may be having intrusive thoughts. Intrusive thoughts are time-consuming and cause significant distress that can impair your ability to function normally. It's common to have unwelcome thoughts, but intrusive thoughts may be caused by a mental health disorder. Lawrence Needleman is quoted.


The science behind why people have missed traveling
May 13, 2021 | Boston Globe
Online audience: 2.1 million

There’s science behind why people missed travel so much and are returning to it so eagerly. Travel forces the brain to do such things as navigate unfamiliar places or communicate in other languages, for example, which research shows can bolster creativity and focus. It disrupts routine and exposes people to new things, activating the naturally occurring “feel-good” neurochemical dopamine, which boosts mood and motivation. Ken Yeager is quoted.


Treating Bipolar 1 and Bipolar 2 Disorders
May 5, 2021 | U.S. News & World Report
Online audience: 15 million
MSN (via U.S. News & World Report)
Online audience: 67.2 million

We've all experienced the highs and lows of life, from the occasional blue mood to the euphoria that comes with a big accomplishment or happy experience. But many people spend a large portion of their lives in a middle ground zone, where stable mood and predictable behaviors are the status quo. Dr. Samar McCutcheon is quoted.


Returning to the office after COVID could be stressful
April 24, 2021 | Voice of America
Online audience: 2.3 million

Now that half of all U.S. adults have received at least one COVID-19 vaccine shot, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, millions of Americans who’ve worked from home during the pandemic are starting to wonder if they’ll be called back to the office anytime soon. It’s a switch up that comes at a time when many are already experiencing higher-than-normal feelings of stress and anxiety. Kristen Carpenter is quoted.


Handshakes? Hugs? How to Navigate the New COVID Etiquette After Vaccines
April 20, 2021 | Wall Street Journal
Print audience: 994,600
Online audience: 11.7 million

As people soldiered through months of the pandemic, they got accustomed to COVID-era social etiquette: distancing, masking, avoiding contact. But now as vaccinations rise, expectations around social interactions are changing again—and nobody knows how to navigate them. Dr. K. Luan Phan is quoted.


12 Proven Strategies to Stop Overthinking and Ease Anxiety Now
March 24, 2021 | U.S. News & World Report
Online audience: 15 million
Yahoo! News (via U.S. News & World Report)
Online audience: 36.1 million

What if I said the wrong thing? How will I ever finish the assignment in time? Why isn’t he responding to my text? Thoughts like these make us human. “However, we often find ourselves stuck in a spiral of predicting, playing out different scenarios and often catastrophizing,” says Sophie Lazarus, a psychologist at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus.


How's Your Mental Health? 1 Year Into Pandemic, Experts Offer Advice
March 11, 2021 | Today.com
Online audience: 6 million
MSN (via Today.com)
Online audience: 67.2 million

Exactly one year ago, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the coronavirus a global pandemic. In following months, millions of people around the world contracted the disease, and more than 2.5 million people were killed by the virus; more than 500,000 of those deaths were in the United States alone. It's no surprise that these major changes had a serious impact on the country's collective mental health. Dr. K. Luan Phan is quoted.


AP-NORC Poll: 1 In 5 In US Lost Someone Close In Pandemic
March 11, 2021 | ABC News (+ 12 outlets via AP)
Online audience: 13.9 million

A new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research illustrates how the stage is set for a two-tiered recovery. But people still in mourning express frustration at the continued struggle to stay safe. Dr. K. Luan Phan is quoted.


30% of COVID Survivors May Have PTSD: 'This Is A Very Scary Experience For The Patients'
February 26, 2021 | Yahoo!
Online audience: 149.3 million

A new study published in JAMA Psychiatry found that more than 30 percent of COVID-19 survivors may develop PTSD (posttraumatic stress disorder) — a mental health condition that is triggered by a traumatic event and hallmarked by flashbacks of the trauma, nightmares and severe anxiety. Arianna Galligher is quoted.


How to Improve Your Mood During Stressful Times
February 11, 2021 | Columbus Monthly
Audience: 21,935

There wasn’t a lot to love about 2020. Stockpiling sanitizer, disinfecting groceries and settling for smiles on Zoom rather than seeing them in person became pile-on stressors in an already unsettling time. Sophie Lazarus is quoted.


Marijuana Abuse By Youth With Mood Disorders Linked To Suicide Attempts, Self-Harm And Death, Study Finds
January 21, 2021 | CNN (+ 23 outlets)
Online audience: 49 million
MedicineNet (via HealthDay)
Online audience: 3.9 million

Heavy use of marijuana by teens and young adults with mood disorders -- such as depression and bipolar disorder -- is linked to an increased risk of self-harm, suicide attempts and death, a new study has found. Cynthia Fontanella is quoted. This coverage resulted from pitching efforts and a multimedia release distributed by OSUWMC Media Relations.


Opinion: Veteran Suicides — Here's How We Help
Jnauary 10, 2021 | The Hill
Online audience: 8 million

Dr. Craig Bryan writes… President Donald Trump recently signed into law Senate Bill 785, a bipartisan legislation aimed at improving health care for and reducing suicide rates among American veterans. The bill isn’t a magic bullet that will solve all of our problems, but it provides us with an excellent opportunity to talk about suicide among veterans, an important topic that is too rarely in the spotlight.


The Psychological Reason It’s So Hard To Work Today After The Riot — And How To Cop
January 7, 2021 | CNBC
Online audience: 19.2 million

People across the country are still reeling after pro-Trump rioters violently stormed the U.S. Capitol Wednesday. Many are feeling nervous, anxious, distracted, in a fog or overwhelmed. And many are wondering how to focus on work when nothing feels certain. Arianna Galligher is quoted.

Ohio State Expert: This New Year, Resolve To Give Yourself A Break
December 9, 2020 | WABG-TV

New Year’s Day is typically a time to make resolutions, such as exercising more, eating better or losing weight. But this year, mental health experts at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center say making such major New Year’s resolutions during these chaotic times can add more stress and be counterproductive. Instead, take some time to reset, focusing on what you can do to take better care of yourself in 2021. Sophie Lazarus is quoted. This coverage resulted from pitching efforts and a multimedia release distributed by OSUWMC Media Relations.

 

 

2020 Archived Media 


How Less Light In Fall And Winter Affects Our Emotions
November 5, 2020 | Spectrum News (Cleveland)

Our sunset is getting earlier and earlier with each passing day and as we move to mid and late fall the seemingly shorter days in longer nights may keep us inside more. And there are other effects that the dwindling amount of sunlight can have. We’ll break down why less light can wreak havoc on us emotionally in more ways than one. Sophie Lazarus is quoted.


Keeping Peace Amidst Different Political Views During Election Season
October 21, 2020 | WKOW-TV

This election season has divided the country like no other. "Our country is divided more than ever," said Dr. K. Luan Phan, a psychiatrist at Ohio State University's Wexner Medical Center. Opposing views can not only impact your mental health, but can sever friendships or damage relationships between family members.


Gen Z Is the Most Stressed Out Group in America, Poll Finds
October 20, 2020 | Newsweek

The American Psychological Association's (APA) Stress in American 2020 report revealed that, on average, Gen Z adults scored their stress levels in the past month as 6.1 out of 10, with 10 being the highest level. The average across all adults was 5. Ken Yeager is quoted.


Youth suicide rates were escalating pre-pandemic. Here's how to keep the coronavirus crisis from making it worse
AOL

September is National Suicide Prevention Month, an annual U.S. campaign to raise awareness for suicide, and National Suicide Prevention Week, a dedicated time “to share resources and stories,” runs from Sunday to Saturday. Amid rising suicide rates among youth and the mental health threats posed by the coronavirus pandemic, experts are sharing tips for helping teens and children. Craig Bryan is quoted.


Timely follow-up reduces suicide risk for youths discharged from psychiatric hospital
Healio

Youths who received outpatient mental health follow-up within 1 week of psychiatric hospital discharge appeared at reduced risk for suicide in the immediate period after discharge, according to study results published in JAMA Network Open. Cynthia A. Fontanella is quoted.


Study: Google Searches For Anxiety Symptoms Are Up During Pandemic
August 27, 2020 | WCAX-TV

From COVID-19 to job insecurity to social distancing to protests against racial inequality, 2020 hasn’t been easy. “All those things, I think, are waves of pandemics that are increasingly building upon one another,” according to Dr. K. Luan Phan, who heads the department of psychiatry and behavioral health at Ohio State University’s Wexner Medical Center.


Health Effects of Unemployment
July 24, 2020 | U.S. News & World Report

Since the coronavirus pandemic was declared in mid-March, many Americans have suffered job losses. As of this writing, the national unemployment rate stands at 11.1%, and some 17,750,000 people are unemployed. This paints a bleak economic picture as a whole, but individually, it could have far reaching health impacts too. Dr. K. Luan Phan is quoted.

Ohio State Professor Helps Create Child Care Fund for Black Women
The Columbus Dispatch - August 6, 2020 | Read full article

The effort hopes to help change the statistics that show that many women drop out of medical or science fields soon after having their first child. Tamar Gur, MD, is quoted.


Bipolar Disorder Can Require 'Rapid Intervention' — All About the Illness Kanye West Faces
People - July 24, 2020 | Read full article

On Wednesday, Kim Kardashian West asked for “compassion” for Kanye West as he manages a new cycle in his bipolar disorder. The rapper, 43, has spoken openly in the past about his history with the mood disorder, which he was first diagnosed with about three years ago. Samar McCutcheon, MD, is quoted.


Health Effects of Unemployment
U.S. News & World Report - July 24, 2020 | Read full article

Since the coronavirus pandemic was declared in mid-March, many Americans have suffered job losses. As of this writing, the national unemployment rate stands at 11.1%, and some 17,750,000 people are unemployed. This paints a bleak economic picture as a whole, but individually, it could have far reaching health impacts too. K. Luan Phan, MD, is quoted.


Preventing COVID Is So Exhausting
Men’s Health - July 9, 2020 | Read full article

You’re tired of hearing about COVID-19, tired of watching out for it. If you look at scenes of packed beaches and bars, you’d say the coronavirus pandemic is wearing thin. People are just burned out on dealing with it. Doug Misquitta, MD, is quoted.


COVID-19 Pandemic Creating an Unintended Epidemic - Loneliness
WBNS-TV/10 - July 2, 2020 | Read full article

While dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic, we're also dealing with an unintended consequence - what experts are calling a "loneliness epidemic."  Even though we're using technology to stay connected, we can still feel isolated. Janice Kiecolt-Glaser, PhD, and Sophie Lazarus, PhD, are quoted.


12 Best Exercises to Ease Stress and Anxiety
U.S. News & World Report - June 19, 2020 | Read full article

Stress is a fact of life, but it can be a double-edged sword. In small doses, it can boost alertness and performance. But when you’re constantly stressed, that can have a significant downside. Chelsi Day, PsyD, is quoted.


10 Powerful Ways to Overcome Anger or a Bad Mood
U.S. News & World Report - June 5, 2020 | Read full article

You have a fight with your best friend. You don't get that promotion you wanted. You wrangle through bad traffic and bad drivers to get somewhere in a rush. All of these examples could set off anger or a bad mood. Sophie Lazarus, PhD, is quoted.


Police Brutality Imagery On Social Media Can Cause Lasting Trauma, Especially For Black People
Insider - June 3, 2020 | Read full article

Images and video of police brutality during protests are being widely disseminated on social media as people continue to protest the death of George Floyd. These images can cause trauma, especially for black people who have witnessed or experienced racist events in their own lives, experts say. Ken Yeager, PhD, is quoted. 


That Feeling You Have Might Be Situational Depression
Today - May 28, 2020 | Read full article

The COVID-19 pandemic has trapped most people in their homes and little things, like getting dressed and showering, seem less important now. Some people might lack motivation and interest in things they once loved, sleep more, become more irritable or battle insomnia. While these feelings and behaviors could be normal reactions to stress, they also could be a symptom of a more serious mental health issue. Sophie Lazarus, PhD, is quoted.


The Coronavirus Is Creating A Mental Health Crisis In America’s Workforce
HuffPost - May 27, 2020 | Read full article

Over a third of workers in the U.S. are currently struggling with mental health issues, ranging from moderate distress to serious mental illness. That’s according to a study conducted in March, just as the coronavirus pandemic was beginning to hit the country. Cheryl Carmin, PhD, is quoted.


Working From Home? Here's How To Have Job-Life Boundaries During The Pandemic
Yahoo! - May 27, 2020 | Read full article

COVID-19 has forced many people to work remotely, some for the first time ever. And despite all of the fantasies that working from home is a breeze compared to going into an office, many have found it can be the opposite. Mary Fristad, PhD, is quoted.


What to Expect When Calling a Mental Health Hotline
U.S. News & World Report - April 29, 2020 | Read full article

In times of extreme stress, crisis or a mental health emergency, where would you turn? For many people, the answer is a mental health hotline. Ken Yeager, PhD, is quoted.


COVID-19 Pushes People Into Uncomfortable Places as They Ask for Help
Spectrum News 1 - April 27, 2020 | Read full article

Millions of Americans who are used to working have recently found themselves in the tough place of being unemployed and unable to take care of their basic needs on their own. For many, the idea of not being able to do so has caused varying levels of shame and embarrassment as they now seek help from others. Travis Westbrook, PhD, is quoted.


'There's No Wrong Way To Feel': The Grief Of The Coronavirus Pandemic
Today - April 8, 2020 | Read full article

As the pandemic lingers feelings change from fear, anxiety and concern to mourning over losses and nostalgia for the mundane. K. Luan Phan, MD, is quoted. 


The Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health is proud of our esteemed faculty members because they never stop elevating the department's reputation. This is seen in part by their dedication to providing accurate medical information for news articles, blogs and more.

Ohio State Professor Helps Create Child Care Fund for Black Women
The Columbus Dispatch - August 6, 2020 | Read full article

The effort hopes to help change the statistics that show that many women drop out of medical or science fields soon after having their first child. Tamar Gur, MD, is quoted.


Bipolar Disorder Can Require 'Rapid Intervention' — All About the Illness Kanye West Faces
People - July 24, 2020 | Read full article

On Wednesday, Kim Kardashian West asked for “compassion” for Kanye West as he manages a new cycle in his bipolar disorder. The rapper, 43, has spoken openly in the past about his history with the mood disorder, which he was first diagnosed with about three years ago. Samar McCutcheon, MD, is quoted.


Health Effects of Unemployment
U.S. News & World Report - July 24, 2020 | Read full article

Since the coronavirus pandemic was declared in mid-March, many Americans have suffered job losses. As of this writing, the national unemployment rate stands at 11.1%, and some 17,750,000 people are unemployed. This paints a bleak economic picture as a whole, but individually, it could have far reaching health impacts too. K. Luan Phan, MD, is quoted.


Preventing COVID Is So Exhausting
Men’s Health - July 9, 2020 | Read full article

You’re tired of hearing about COVID-19, tired of watching out for it. If you look at scenes of packed beaches and bars, you’d say the coronavirus pandemic is wearing thin. People are just burned out on dealing with it. Doug Misquitta, MD, is quoted.


COVID-19 Pandemic Creating an Unintended Epidemic - Loneliness
WBNS-TV/10 - July 2, 2020 | Read full article

While dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic, we're also dealing with an unintended consequence - what experts are calling a "loneliness epidemic."  Even though we're using technology to stay connected, we can still feel isolated. Janice Kiecolt-Glaser, PhD, and Sophie Lazarus, PhD, are quoted.


12 Best Exercises to Ease Stress and Anxiety
U.S. News & World Report - June 19, 2020 | Read full article

Stress is a fact of life, but it can be a double-edged sword. In small doses, it can boost alertness and performance. But when you’re constantly stressed, that can have a significant downside. Chelsi Day, PsyD, is quoted.


10 Powerful Ways to Overcome Anger or a Bad Mood
U.S. News & World Report - June 5, 2020 | Read full article

You have a fight with your best friend. You don't get that promotion you wanted. You wrangle through bad traffic and bad drivers to get somewhere in a rush. All of these examples could set off anger or a bad mood. Sophie Lazarus, PhD, is quoted.


Police Brutality Imagery On Social Media Can Cause Lasting Trauma, Especially For Black People
Insider - June 3, 2020 | Read full article

Images and video of police brutality during protests are being widely disseminated on social media as people continue to protest the death of George Floyd. These images can cause trauma, especially for black people who have witnessed or experienced racist events in their own lives, experts say. Ken Yeager, PhD, is quoted. 


That Feeling You Have Might Be Situational Depression
Today - May 28, 2020 | Read full article

The COVID-19 pandemic has trapped most people in their homes and little things, like getting dressed and showering, seem less important now. Some people might lack motivation and interest in things they once loved, sleep more, become more irritable or battle insomnia. While these feelings and behaviors could be normal reactions to stress, they also could be a symptom of a more serious mental health issue. Sophie Lazarus, PhD, is quoted.


The Coronavirus Is Creating A Mental Health Crisis In America’s Workforce
HuffPost - May 27, 2020 | Read full article

Over a third of workers in the U.S. are currently struggling with mental health issues, ranging from moderate distress to serious mental illness. That’s according to a study conducted in March, just as the coronavirus pandemic was beginning to hit the country. Cheryl Carmin, PhD, is quoted.


Working From Home? Here's How To Have Job-Life Boundaries During The Pandemic
Yahoo! - May 27, 2020 | Read full article

COVID-19 has forced many people to work remotely, some for the first time ever. And despite all of the fantasies that working from home is a breeze compared to going into an office, many have found it can be the opposite. Mary Fristad, PhD, is quoted.


What to Expect When Calling a Mental Health Hotline
U.S. News & World Report - April 29, 2020 | Read full article

In times of extreme stress, crisis or a mental health emergency, where would you turn? For many people, the answer is a mental health hotline. Ken Yeager, PhD, is quoted.


COVID-19 Pushes People Into Uncomfortable Places as They Ask for Help
Spectrum News 1 - April 27, 2020 | Read full article

Millions of Americans who are used to working have recently found themselves in the tough place of being unemployed and unable to take care of their basic needs on their own. For many, the idea of not being able to do so has caused varying levels of shame and embarrassment as they now seek help from others. Travis Westbrook, PhD, is quoted.


'There's No Wrong Way To Feel': The Grief Of The Coronavirus Pandemic
Today - April 8, 2020 | Read full article

As the pandemic lingers feelings change from fear, anxiety and concern to mourning over losses and nostalgia for the mundane. K. Luan Phan, MD, is quoted. 

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