Proper function of your eyelids is crucial to maintaining your eye health. Your eyelids protect your eyes by keeping out dust and debris. Blinking also stops foreign objects from entering and helps your eyes stay consistently moist. Eyelid disorders can cause eyelid drooping, twitching, inflammation, paralysis and growths. Our oculoplastic surgeons at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center know how to treat the full range of conditions affecting your eyelids.

  • Eyelid Drooping: Eyelid ptosis (blepharoptosis) is one of the most common conditions treated by oculoplastic surgeons, and can be caused by age, trauma, surgery, nerve damage or muscular disease. There are several different surgical techniques that can be used to fix ptosis.
  • Excess Eyelid Skin: Excessive eyelid skin (dermatochalasis) is usually caused by age and can be corrected with a surgery called blepharoplasty.
  • Brow Drooping: Drooping of the eyebrows (brow ptosis) can be caused by age or weakness of the forehead muscles. There are many ways to fix brow ptosis, and your oculoplastic surgeon can help you decide which surgery is right for you.
  • Ectropion and Entropion: Ectropion and entropion (outward and inward lid turning, respectively) are usually seen in older patients, but can also be caused by infections, trauma, surgery and inflammatory conditions. An examination by an oculoplastic surgeon is needed to determine the best way to fix it.
  • Trichiasis: There are many ways to treat misdirected eyelashes, including removal with electrolysis, surgical removal and surgical treatment of the eyelid if it is turned in (entropion).
  • Lid Retraction: Age, trauma, surgery, muscle weakness and inflammation are some of the more common causes of eyelid retraction. The treatment depends on the underlying cause.
  • Facial Paralysis: Patients with facial weakness often have trouble closing the eye, which can cause severe dryness or even blindness. There are many ways to help with this problem, including implanting small weights in the upper eyelid, tightening the lower eyelid, and fusing the outside corner of the eyelids together (tarsorrhaphy).
  • Eyelid Lacerations: No two eyelid lacerations are the same, and an experienced oculoplastic surgeon can repair any laceration to give you the best chance of restoring normal eyelid function and appearance.
  • Tumors: Most eyelid tumors are not cancers, but an oculoplastic surgeon can examine you and discuss the best treatment options with you. Sometimes, a small biopsy is needed to determine whether a tumor is benign or malignant.
  • Blepharospasm/Hemifacial Spasm: Chronic spasms of the eyelid and facial muscles that interfere with daily activities can be treated with Botox injections, and sometimes with surgery.
  • Cosmetic Surgery: Surgical rejuvenation of the eyes and face such as upper and lower blepharoplasty, endoscopic browlift, and cheek lift is available on a self-pay basis. Consultation with an oculoplastic surgeon can help you decide which of the many options are right for you.
  • Eyelid Defects After Surgery: Removal of skin cancer is often performed by dermatologists trained in a special technique called Mohs surgery. When the cancer involves the eyelids or upper face, an oculoplastic surgeon can reconstruct the resulting defect to give you the best chance of restoring normal eyelid function and appearance.