Learn more about how Ohio State is leading the way in organ transplantation!

Why choose Ohio State for heart transplant?

Experience: Our Comprehensive Transplant Center has one of the largest organ transplant programs in the nation. We perform more than 475 kidney, liver, pancreas, combined kidney-pancreas, heart and lung transplants each year. Since our program started in 1967, we have performed more than 10,000 lifesaving transplants including 525 heart transplants.

Leading-edge treatments: Ohio State's team of researchers was among the first in the nation to evaluate the use of cyclosporine, a drug that suppresses the immune system and dramatically improves the success of organ transplantation. Ohio State was also the fourth institution in the country certified to implant the temporary CardioWest™ Total Artificial Heart, which serves as a bridge to transplant for the most critically ill patients.

Heart transplant research: Our research teams are studying new methods to lengthen the amount of time a heart remains viable for transplantation.

 

Heart Transplant Candidates

Heart Transplant Candidates

Several diseases and conditions may cause heart failure, resulting in the need for a heart transplant:
  • Ischemic cardiomyopathy: happens when an artery leading to the heart becomes narrowed or blocked for a short time and oxygen-rich blood cannot reach your heart. In most cases of ischemia, this temporary blood shortage to the heart causes pain in the chest (called angina pectoris). In certain other cases, there is no pain. These cases are called silent ischemia
  • Non-ischemic cardiomyopathy: predominately involves the heart's abnormal structure and function. It does not involve the hardening of arteries on the heart surface typically associated with ischemic cardiomyopathy
  • Post-partum cardiomyopathy: a rare type of heart failure that is diagnosed in women during the last month of pregnancy or within five months following delivery. The damage weakens the heart muscle and causes the heart to become enlarged. As a result, the heart can’t pump blood properly throughout the rest of the body
  • Malignant arrhythmias: abnormal electrical signals in the heart that cause impairment, preventing the heart from beating in an organized rhythm and may cause sudden cardiac death
  • Intractable angina: debilitating chest pain or discomfort that occurs during exercise and exertion that prevents living a meaningful quality of life and is not treatable by opening up more blood flow to the heart
Screenings before transplant ensure that you are in good medical and psychological health and that you have the motivation and support to comply with treatment plans. Some conditions may prevent a heart transplant from being performed (including kidney, lung or liver disease, insulin-dependent diabetes with poor function of other organs, other types of blood vessel disease of the neck and leg). All patients must meet the chemical dependency requirements of the Ohio Solid Organ Transplantation Consortium.

Patient Process

Heart Transplant Process

Heart Transplant Process

A goal of our Comprehensive Transplant Center is to ensure our transplant patients experience a thorough continuity of services through the entire transplant process, including pre-transplant evaluation, communication throughout the waiting process, acute medical care during and following surgery, intensive outpatient treatment, post-transplant outpatient visits and ongoing telephone follow-up.

Treatment Team

Heart Transplant Team

Heart Transplant Team

Our Comprehensive Transplant Center treatment team includes:

Frequently Asked Questions

Heart Transplant Frequently Asked Questions

Heart Transplant Frequently Asked Questions

Our Latest Heart Transplant News

Share this Page